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Projecting Productivity Growth: Lessons from the U.S. Growth Resurgence

  • Dale W. Jorgenson
  • Mun S. Ho
  • Kevin J. Stiroh

Abstract

The unusual combination of more rapid output growth and lower inflation from 1995 to 2000 has touched off a strenuous debate among economists about whether improvements in U.S. economic performance can be sustained. This debate has intensified with the recession that began in March 2001, and the economic impacts of the events of September 11 are still imperfectly understood. Both factors add to the considerable uncertainties about future growth that currently face decision makers in both the public and private sectors.

Keywords

Labor Productivity Productivity Growth Capital Stock Total Factor Productivity Output Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale W. Jorgenson
    • 1
  • Mun S. Ho
    • 2
  • Kevin J. Stiroh
    • 3
  1. 1.Harvard UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Resources for the FutureUSA
  3. 3.Federal Reserve Bank of New YorkUSA

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