Econometrics of Mail Demand

A Comparison between Cross-section and Dynamic Data
  • Catherine Cazals
  • Jean-Pierre Florens
Chapter
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 44)

Abstract

The investigation of mail demand reveals that it is a complex phenomenon. This is for a number of reasons. First and foremost, this complexity arises because the concept of “mail” encompasses an extremely wide range of products (first class letters, second class letters, parcels, newspapers, etc.) distributed to many different consumers (households, firms, and postal administrations, such as public corporations or government departments). Second, even if postal services in most countries are a legal monopoly for mail processing, some form of competition in terms of substitute products like the telephone, e-mail and fax must be taken into account.

Keywords

Income Assure Monopoly 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Cazals
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Florens
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Toulouse (IDEI-GREMAQ)France

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