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Oxygenation and Blood Concentration Changes in Human Subject Prefrontal Activation by Anagram Solutions

  • Britton Chance
  • Shoko Nioka
  • Sajid Sadi
  • Connie Li
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 510)

Abstract

The goal of this five year project has been to better understand learning and problem solving, and eventually to make a classroom “Cognoscope” using Near Infrared (NIR) imaging. This will let us measure cognitive function online with students. Our imager measures cognitive activated oxygenation and blood concentration of changes in the prefrontal cortex. The scan time is one second, with 50 millisecond per light flash. We use a 3 wavelength LED, the advantage of which is FDA approval is not needed for power higher than 100 microwatts, while a laser diode at over 100 microwatts requires Class III regulations and switches, yellow stickers, and dead man contacts. Small silicon diode detectors with IC are used for detectors which are followed by sample and hold, ADC and signal processing giving a simultaneous time course of 18 outputs.

Keywords

Prefrontal Region Blood Volume Change Anagram Solution Chaotic Pattern Semantic Satiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Britton Chance
    • 1
  • Shoko Nioka
    • 1
  • Sajid Sadi
    • 1
  • Connie Li
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaDepartment of Biochemistry and BiophysicsPhiladelphia

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