Advertisement

Creativity, Adolescence

  • Sally M. Reis
  • Joseph S. Renzulli

Abstract

This entry highlights some of the major issues associated with promoting high levels of creative potential and achievement in talented adolescents. It summarizes recent research about the environmental factors, and school and home programs, that are more likely to result in the realization of creative talent.

Keywords

Creative Potential Creative Product Talented Student Multiple Intelligence Creative Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amabile, T. (1989). Growing up creative: Nurturing a lifetime of creativity.New York: Crown.Google Scholar
  2. Barron, F. (1988). Putting creativity to work. In R.J. Sternberg (Ed.), The nature of creativity. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Baum, S., Renzulli, J.S., & Hébert, T.P. (1995). The prism metaphor: A new paradigm for reversing underachievement (Collaborative Research Study 95310). Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented.Google Scholar
  4. Bloom, B. (Ed.). (1985). Developing talent in young people. New York:Ballantine Books.Google Scholar
  5. Chapman, S.M. (1991). Introducing young children to real problems of today and tomorrow. Gifted Child Today, 14(2), 14–18.Google Scholar
  6. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The psychology of optimal experience.New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  7. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: HarperCollins.Google Scholar
  8. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1998). Creativity and genius: A systems perspective.In A. Steptoe (Ed.), Genius and the mind: Studies of creativity and temperament. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Csikszentmihalyi, M., Rathunde, K., & Whalen, S. (1993). Talented teenagers: The roots of success and failure. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Daniels, S. (1997). Creativity in the classroom: Characteristics, climate, and curriculum. In N. Colangelo & G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of gifted education (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  11. Davis, G.A. (1992). Creativity is forever. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt.Google Scholar
  12. Davis, G.A. (1999). Creativity is forever (4th ed.).Google Scholar
  13. Delcourt, M.A.B. (1988). Characteristics related to high levels of creative/productive behavior in secondary school students: A multi-case study. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University ofConnecticut, Storrs.Google Scholar
  14. Delcourt, M.A.B. (1994). Characteristics of high level creative productivity: A longitudinal study of students identified by Renzulli’s three-ring conception of giftedness. In R.F. Subotnik & K.D. Arnold (Eds.),Beyond Terman (pp. 401–436). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
  15. Gardner, H. (1983). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences.New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  16. Gardner, H. (1993). Creating minds. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  17. Hébert, T.P. (1993). A developmental examination of young creative producers. Roeper Review: A Journal on Gifted Education, 16, 22–28.Google Scholar
  18. Kirschenbaum, R.J., & Reis, S.M. (1997). Conflicts in creativity: Talented female artists. Creativity Research Journal, 10(2&3), 251–263.Google Scholar
  19. MacKinnon, D.W. (1978). In search of human effectiveness. Buffalo, NY: Creative Education Foundation.Google Scholar
  20. Perleth, C., Sierwald, W., & Heller, K.A. (1993). Selected results of the Munich longitudinal study of giftedness: The multidimensional/ typological giftedness model. Roeper Review, 15(3), 149–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pirozzo, R. (1982). Gifted underachievers. Roeper Review, 4, 18–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Reis, S.M. (1998). Work left undone: Compromises and challenges of talented females. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  23. Reis, S.M., Burns, D.E., & Renzulli, J.S. (1992). Curriculum compacting: The complete guide to modifying the regular curriculum for high ability students. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  24. Reis, S.M., Hébert, T.P., Diaz, E.P., Maxfield, L.R., & Ratley, M.E. (1995). Case studies of talented students who achieve and underachieve in an urban high school [Research Monograph 95120]. Storrs, CT: National Research Center for the Gifted and Talented.Google Scholar
  25. Reis, S.M., & McCoach, D.B. (2000). The underachievement of gifted students: What do we know and where do we go? Gifted Child Quarterly, 44, 152–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Renzulli, J.S. (1977). The enrichment triad model: A guide for developing defensible programs for the gifted and talented. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  27. Renzulli, J.S. (1978). What makes giftedness? Reexamining a definition. Phi Delta Kappan, 60, 180–184, 261.Google Scholar
  28. Renzulli, J.S. (1986). The three ring conception of giftedness: A developmental model for creative productivity. In R.J. Sternberg & J.E. Davidson (Eds.), Conceptions of giftedness (pp. 53–92). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Renzulli, J.S., & Reis, S.M. (1985). The schoolwide enrichment model: A comprehensive plan for educational excellence. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  30. Renzulli, J.S., & Reis, S.M. (1994). Research related to the Schoolwide Enrichment Model. Gifted Child Quarterly, 38, 2–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Renzulli, J.S., & Reis, S.M. (1997). The schoolwide enrichment model: A how-to guide for educational excellence. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  32. Renzulli, J.S., & Smith, L.H. (1978). The compactor. Mansfield Center, CT: Creative Learning Press.Google Scholar
  33. Rimm, S.B., & Olenchak, F.R. (1991). How FPS helps underachieving gifted students. Gifted Child Today, 14(2), 19–22.Google Scholar
  34. Rothenberg, A. (1990). Creativity and madness: New findings and old stereotypes. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Runco, M.A. (1992). The evaluative, valuative, and divergent thinking of children. Journal of Creative Behavior, 25, 311–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Russ, S., Robins, A., & Christano, B. (1999). Imaginative youngsters become creative problem solvers. Creativity Research Journal, 12, 129–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Simonton, D.K. (1988). Scientific genius: A psychology of science. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  38. Starko, A.J. (1986). The effects of the revolving door identification model on creative productivity and self-efficacy. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Connecticut, Storrs.Google Scholar
  39. Sternberg, R.J., & Lubart, T. (1993). Creative giftedness: A multivariate investment approach. Gifted Child Quarterly, 37(1), 7–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Torrance, E.P. (1962). Guiding creative talent. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Torrance, E.P. (1978). Healing qualities of creative behavior. Creative Child and Adult Quarterly, 3(3), 146–158.Google Scholar
  42. Torrance, E.P. (1984). Some products of twenty-five years of creativity research. Educational perspectives, 22(3), 3–8.Google Scholar
  43. Torrance, E.P. (1987). Teaching for creativity. In S.G. Isaksen (Ed.), Frontiers of creativity research: Beyond the basics (pp. 189–215). Buffalo, NY: Bearly Limited.Google Scholar
  44. Torrance, E.P. (1988). The nature of creativity as manifest in its testing. In R.W. Sternberg (Ed.), The nature of creativity. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Torrance, E.P. (1995). Why fly? A philosophy of creativity. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.Google Scholar
  46. Walberg, H.J., & Stariha (1992). Productive human capital: Learning, creativity, and eminence. Creativity Research Journal, 5, 323–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Walberg, H.J., & Zeiser, S. (1997). Productivity, accomplishment, and eminence. In N. Colangelo & G.A. Davis (Eds.), Handbook of gifted education (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  48. Whitmore, J.R. (1980). Giftedness, conflict, and underachievement. Boston: Allen & Bacon.Google Scholar
  49. Wildauer, C.A. (1984). Identification and nurturance of the intellectually gifted young child within the regular classroom: Case histories. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Educational Information Center (ERIC Document No. ED254041).Google Scholar
  50. Willings, D. (1983). The gifted child grows up. Washington, DC: US Department of Education, Educational Information Center (ERIC Document No. ED252038).Google Scholar
  51. Winner, E. (1996). Gifted children: Myths and realities. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  52. Winner, E., & Martino, G. (1993). Giftedness in the visual arts and music. In K.A. Heller, F.J. Monks, & A.H. Passow (Eds.), International handbook of research and development of giftedness and talent (pp. 253-281). New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally M. Reis
  • Joseph S. Renzulli

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations