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Effects Of Overexpression Of Prostacyclin Synthase In Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

  • Chieko Yokoyama
  • Tatemi Todaka
  • Hiroji Yanamoto
  • Toshihisa Hatae
  • Shuntaro Hara
  • Manabu Shimonishi
  • Susumu Ohkawara
  • Masayuki Wada
  • Tadashi Tanabe
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 507)

Abstract

Prostacyclin (PGI2) generated mainly by blood vessels, is a short-lived endogenous inhibitor of platelet aggregation and a potent vasodilator, contributing to the maintenance of homeostasis in vascular system., 2 In addition, exogenously added PGI2 and its stable analogues inhibited the growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC).3-6 However, it is not known if the locally synthesized PGI2 would similarly inhibit the growth in an autocrine and for paracrine manner.

Keywords

Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Vehicle Group Left Carotid Artery Balloon Injury Prostacyclin Analogue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chieko Yokoyama
    • 1
  • Tatemi Todaka
    • 2
  • Hiroji Yanamoto
    • 2
  • Toshihisa Hatae
    • 1
  • Shuntaro Hara
    • 1
  • Manabu Shimonishi
    • 1
  • Susumu Ohkawara
    • 1
  • Masayuki Wada
    • 1
    • 3
  • Tadashi Tanabe
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyNational Cardiovascular Center Research InstituteSuita, OsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Cerebrovascular SurgeryNational Cardiovascular Center Research InstituteSuita, OsakaJapan
  3. 3.Osaka University Graduate School of MedicineSuita, OsakaJapan

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