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Functional Behavioral Assessment of Nonverbal Behavior

  • Christopher H. Skinner
  • Ruth A. Ervin

Abstract

Interest in functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures may be traced to several factors. First, a long-established and evolving research base has demonstrated that FBA procedures can play an important role in preventing and remedying problem behaviors, particularly in people with disabilities (Ervin, Ehrhardt, & Poling, 2001). Second, psychologists and educators have often sought to enhance service delivery by linking assessment procedures to interventions, thereby unifying these primary service activities (Batsche & Knoff, 1995; Gresham & Lambros, 1998). Third, recent statutory changes in how students with disabilities are served have enhanced interest in functional behavioral assessment across psychoeducational professionals (Nelson, Roberts, Rutherford, Mathur, & Aaroe, 1999; Telzrow, 1999; Yell & Shriner, 1997).

Keywords

Task Demand Target Behavior Target Student School Psychology Review Direct Observation System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher H. Skinner
    • 1
  • Ruth A. Ervin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational Psychology and CounselingUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyWestern Michigan UniversityKalamazooUSA

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