Absolute Frequency-Domain Pulse Oximetry of the Brain: Methodology and Measurements

  • Martin Wolf
  • Maria A. Franceschini
  • Lelia A. Paunescu
  • Vlad Toronov
  • Antonios Michalos
  • Ursula Wolf
  • Enrico Gratton
  • Sergio Fantini
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 530)

Abstract

A new method to non-invasively measure the absolute tissue oxygen saturation (SO2) and arterial oxygen saturation (fdSaO2) by frequency-domain spectroscopy is described. This method is based on the quantitative measurement of the tissue absorption spectrum, which is used to determine global SO2. From the amplitude of absorption changes caused by arterial pulsation oscillations, in the range of 633-841 nm, the fdSaO2 can be calculated. During deoxygenation (air/N2 mixture) experiments, we measured the fdSaO2 and SO2 on the forehead of three healthy volunteers and compared them to the arterial oxygen saturation measured by conventional pulse oximetry (poSaO2) on the finger. fdSaO2 and poSaO2 agree very well (mean difference: -1.2±2.6%). Changes in SO2 were systematically smaller than in fdSaO2 or poSaO2 probably due to autoregulation. The measurements with 4 and 8 wavelengths had comparable quality.

Key words

arterial oxygen saturation frequency domain spectroscopy near infrared spectroscopy tissue oxygen saturation nitrogen inhalation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Wolf
    • 1
  • Maria A. Franceschini
    • 2
  • Lelia A. Paunescu
    • 3
  • Vlad Toronov
    • 3
  • Antonios Michalos
    • 3
  • Ursula Wolf
    • 3
  • Enrico Gratton
    • 3
  • Sergio Fantini
    • 2
  1. 1.Clinic for NeonatologyUniversity HospitalZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Electro-Optics Technology Center, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer ScienceTufts UniversityMedfordUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory for Fluorescence Dynamics, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA

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