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Venous-Arteriolar Reflex in Human Gastrocnemius Studied by NIRS

  • Tiziano Binzoni
  • Loan Ngo
  • Massimo Girardis
  • Roger Springett
  • François Terrier
  • David Delpy
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 530)

Abstract

Heat-up tilting manoeuvre from 0 to 60 degrees induces oxygenated and deoxygenated haemoglobin concentration changes in the human gastrocnemius. These changes, measured by NIRS, can only be partially explained by the blood volume displacement due to the gravitational force. In the present study it is demontrated, by a dye dilution technique (indocyanine green), that a reduction in blood flow (venous-arteriolar and/or spinal reflex) is responsible of the limited oxyhaemoglobin concentration increase observed when going from 0 (2.54 ± 0.48 blood flow in arbitrary units, a.u.) to 60 (1.46 ± 0.55 a.u.) degrees. The proposed technique is potentially applicable to the detection of specific pathological aspects of microcirculation, such as arterial occlusion in the leg, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure, where the venous-arteriolar reflex may be affected.

Key words

human skeletal muscle blood flow near infrared spectroscopy. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tiziano Binzoni
    • 1
  • Loan Ngo
    • 1
  • Massimo Girardis
    • 2
  • Roger Springett
    • 3
  • François Terrier
    • 1
  • David Delpy
    • 3
  1. 1.Depts. of Physiology and RadiologyUniversity of GenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Cattedra di Anestesiologia e RianimazioneUniversità degli StudiUdineItaly
  3. 3.Dept. of Medical Physics and BioengineeringUniversity College LondonUK

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