Towards a European Health Monitoring System

Results of a Pilot Study on Physical Activity
  • Alfred Rütten
  • Heiko Ziemainz
  • Randall Rzewnicki
  • Yves Vanden Auweele
  • Wil T. M. Ooijendijk
  • Frederico Schena
  • Timo Stahl
  • John Welshman

Abstract

The relationships between physical activity (PA) and a wide variety of health and well-being outcomes have been well established in the last decade. Regular PA reduces the risk of premature death and disability from many medical conditions, including coronary heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, and osteoporosis. There is also evidence for a positive relationship with well-being, particularly in alleviating depression and anxiety. Reduction of the large public health burden associated with a sedentary lifestyle has become a priority in many countries and is endorsed by the World Health Organization.

Keywords

Depression Europe Osteoporosis Transportation Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfred Rütten
    • 1
  • Heiko Ziemainz
    • 1
  • Randall Rzewnicki
    • 2
  • Yves Vanden Auweele
    • 2
  • Wil T. M. Ooijendijk
    • 3
  • Frederico Schena
    • 4
  • Timo Stahl
    • 5
  • John Welshman
    • 6
  1. 1.Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Catholic University of LeuvenHeverleeBelgium
  3. 3.TNO Prevention and HealthLeidenThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Centro Interuniversitario di Recerca in Bioingegneria Scienze MotorieRoveretoItaly
  5. 5.University of JyväskyläJyväskyläFinland
  6. 6.Lancaster UniversityLancasterUK

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