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Maritime Heritage Trails in Australia: An Overview and Critique of the Interpretive Programs

  • Cassandra Philippou
  • Mark Staniforth
Part of the The Plenum Series in Underwater Archaeology book series (SSUA)

Abstract

As special-interest tourism, in particular cultural tourism, has become more popular the promotion and presentation of archaeological sites for the public has become increasingly common. For many decades, tourists have been able to participate in archaeological site tours and heritage trails in places like the Middle East and Europe. This phenomenon is seen increasingly in other parts of the world (see, for example, Cleere, 1984, Cleere, 1989; Binks et al., 1988; Hall and McArthur, 1993; Potter, 1994; McManamon and Hatton, 2000). Initially, the presentation of archaeological artifacts and archaeological sites took the form of museum exhibits, site tours, and site open-days. In the last twenty years, however, heritage trails have become an important method of presenting a wide variety of heritage sites, enabling the public to access and enjoy these sites (Uzzell, 1989; Hosty, 1987; Tabata et.al., 1993).

Keywords

Western Australia South Australia National Park Service Promotional Material Cultural Tourism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cassandra Philippou
    • 1
  • Mark Staniforth
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ArchaeologyFlinders UniversityAdelaideAustralia

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