Advertisement

Poverty and Power

  • Isaac Prilleltensky
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology Series book series (ICUP)

Abstract

In the time that it takes you to read this page, approximately 60 children under five will die; most of them from malnutrition and preventable diseases. Hourly, that is about 1,140 children. Annually, that is about 10 million lives. In sub-Saharan Africa, the rate of under-five mortality is 172 per 1,000 live births. In industrialized countries, the rate is 6 per 1,000. While many in the West worry about obesity in children, 149 million children in developing countries experience malnourishment. Some people drink bottled water, others drink only filtered water; 1.1 billion people around the globe have no access to safe water at all (UNICEF, 2001).

Keywords

Social Justice Social Cohesion World Trade Organization Poor Country Poor People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allahar, A., & Cote, J. (1998). Richer and poorer: The structure of inequality in Canada. Toronto: Lorimer.Google Scholar
  2. Aristide, J. B. (2000). Eyes of the heart: Seeking a path for the poor in the age of globalization. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press.Google Scholar
  3. Barnes, C. (1996). Institutional discrimination against disabled people and the campaign for antidiscrimination legislation. In D. Taylor (Ed.), Critical social policy (pp. 95–112). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  4. Carspecken, P. (1996). Critical ethnography in educational research. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. Chase-Lansdale, P., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (Eds.). (1995). Escape from poverty. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Dobbin, M. (1998). The myth of the good corporate citizen: Democracy under the rule of big business. Toronto: Stoddart.Google Scholar
  7. Dudgeon, P., Garvey, D., & Pickett, H. (Eds.). (2000). Working with Indigenous Australians: A handbook for psychologists. Perth, Australia: Gunada Press.Google Scholar
  8. Eckersley, R., (2000). The mixed blessing of material progress: Diminishing returns in the pursuit of progress. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1, 267–292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Eckersley, R. (in press). Culture, health and well-being. In R. Eckersley, J. Dixon, & B. Douglas (Eds.), The social origins of health and well-being. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Faulks, K. (1999). Political sociology: A critical introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Feuerstein, M-T. (1997). Poverty and health: Reaping a richer harvest. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  12. Flyvbjerg, B. (2001). Making social science matter: Why social inquiry fails and how it can succeed again. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Franke, R., & Chasin, B. (2000). Is the Kerala model sustainable? Lessons from the past, prospects for the future. In G. Parayil (Ed.), Kerala: The development experience (pp. 16–39). New York, NY: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  14. Fryer, D. (1998). Editor’s preface: Special issue on unemployment. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 8, 75–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Goodley, D., & Parker, I. (2000). Critical psychology and action research. Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 2, 3–18.Google Scholar
  16. Gurr, J., Mailloux, L., Kinnon, D., & Doerge, S. (1996). Breaking the links between poverty and violence against women. Ottawa: Ministry of Supply and Services Canada.Google Scholar
  17. Howarth, C., Kenway, P., Palmer, G., & Miorelli, R., (2000). Monitoring poverty and social exclusion. York, UK: Joseph Rowntree Foundation.Google Scholar
  18. Huygens, I. (1997, May). Toward social change partnerships: Responding to empowerment of oppressed groups with voluntary depowerment of dominant groups. Paper presented at the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, Columbia, South Carolina.Google Scholar
  19. Interfaith Social Assistance Reform Coalition. (1998). Our neighbours’ voices: Will we listen? Toronto: James Lorimer.Google Scholar
  20. James, E. (2001). Coverage under old-age security programs and protection for the uninsured. In N. Lustig (Ed.), Shielding the poor: Social protection in the developing world (pp. 149–174). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press/Inter-American Development Bank.Google Scholar
  21. Janvry, A., & Sadoulet, E. (2001). Has aggregate income growth been effective in reducing poverty and inequality in Latin America? In N. Lustig (Ed.), Shielding the poor: Social protection in the developing world (pp. 21–39). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press/Inter-American Development Bank.Google Scholar
  22. Kannan, K. (2000). Poverty alleviation as advancing basic human capabilities: Kerala’s achievements compared. In G. Parayil (Ed.), Kerala: The development experience (pp. 40–65). New York, NY: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  23. Kawachi, I., Kennedy, B., Wilkinson, R. (Eds.). (1999). The society and population health reader: Income inequality and health. New York, NY: The New Press.Google Scholar
  24. Korten, D. (1995). When corporations rule the world. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler/Kumarian Press.Google Scholar
  25. Leonard, P. (1997). Postmodern welfare: Reconstructing an emancipatory project. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  26. Lustig, N. (2001). Introduction. In N. Lustig (Ed.), Shielding the poor: Social protection in the developing world (pp. 1–20). Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press/Inter-American Development Bank.Google Scholar
  27. Macfarlane, S., Racelis, M., & Muli-Musiime, F. (2000). Public health in developing countries. Lancet, 356, 841–847.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Marmot, M. (1999). Introduction. In M. Marmot and R. Wilkinson (Eds.). Social determinants of health (pp. 1–16). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Marmot, M., & Wilkinson, R. (Eds.). (1999). Social determinants of health. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Maxwell, S., & Kenway, P. (2000). New thinking on poverty in the UK: Any lessons for the South? London: Overseas Development Institute.Google Scholar
  31. May, J. (2001). An elusive consensus: Definitions, measurement and analysis of poverty. In United Nations Development Programme (Ed.), Choices for the poor (pp. 23–54). New York, NY: United Nations.Google Scholar
  32. McNeely, J. (1999). Community building. Journal of Community Psychology, 27, 741–750.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Narayan, D., Chambers, R., Shah, M., & Petesch, P. (1999). Global synthesis: Consultations with the poor. Poverty Group, World Bank, http://www.worldbank.org/poverty/voices/synthes.pdf Google Scholar
  34. Narayan, D., Chambers, R., Shah, M., & Petesch, P. (2000). Voices of the poor: Crying out for change. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Narayan, D., Patel, R., Schafft, K., Rademacher, A., & Koch-Schulte, S. (2000). Voices of the poor: Can anyone hear us? New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Nelson, G., Lord, J., & Ochoka, J. (2001). Shifting the paradigm in community mental health: Toward empowerment and community. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  37. Nordstrom, H., Ben David, D., & Winters, L. (1999). Trade, income disparity and poverty. Geneva: World Trade Organization.Google Scholar
  38. Parayil, G. (Ed.). (2000). Kerala: The development experience. London: Zed Books.Google Scholar
  39. Power, A. (1996). Area-based poverty and resident empowerment. Urban Studies, 33, 1535–1565.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Prilleltensky, I. (2001). Value-based praxis in community psychology: Moving toward social justice and social action. American Journal of Community Psychology.Google Scholar
  41. Prilleltensky, I., & Nelson, G. (2002). Doing psychology critically: Making a difference in diverse settings. New York, NY: London: Macmillan/Palgrave.Google Scholar
  42. Prilleltensky, I., & Nelson, G. (1997). Community Psychology: Reclaiming social justice. In D. Fox & I. Prilleltensky (Eds.), Critical psychology: An introduction (pp. 166–184) London: Sage.Google Scholar
  43. Prilleltensky, I., & Nelson, G. (2000). Promoting child and family wellness: Priorities for psychological and social interventions. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 10, 85–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Prilleltensky, I., Nelson, G., & Peirson, L. (2001a). The role of power and control in children’s lives: an ecological analysis of pathways toward wellness, resilience, and problems. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 11, 143–158.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Prilleltensky, I., Nelson, G., & Peirson, L. (2001b). Promoting family wellness and preventing child maltreatment. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  46. Putnam, R. (2000). Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.Google Scholar
  47. Ransom, D. (May, 2001). The World Trade Organization [Special Issue]. The New Internationalist, 334.Google Scholar
  48. Razavi, S. (1999). Seeing poverty through a gender lens. International Social Science Journal, 51, 473–482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Robertson, A., Brunner, E., & Sheiham, A. (1999). Food is a political issue. In M. Marmot & R. Wilkinson (Eds.), Social determinants of health (pp. 179–210) Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Sen, A. (1999a). Beyond the crisis: Development strategies in Asia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.Google Scholar
  51. Sen, A. (1999b). Development as freedom. New York, NY: Anchor Books.Google Scholar
  52. Sen, A. (2001). Culture and development. Paper presented at the World Bank Tokyo Meeting, 13 December. http://www.worldbank.org/wbi/B-SPAN/sen_tokyo.pdf Google Scholar
  53. Shaw, M., Dorling, D., & Smith, G. D. (1999). Poverty, social exclusion, and minorities. In M. Marmot and R. Wilkinson (Eds.). Social determinants of health (pp. 211–239). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  54. Snow, L. (1995). Economic development breaks the mold: Community-building, place-targeting, and empowerment zones. Economic Development Quarterly, 9, 185–197.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. The Smith Family. (2000). Financial disadvantage in Australia 1999: The unlucky Australians. Camperdown, NSW: Author.Google Scholar
  56. UNICEF (2001). The state of the world’s children 2002. New York, NY: Author.Google Scholar
  57. UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre (June 2000). A league table of child poverty in rich nations: Report card No. 1. Florence, Italy: Author.Google Scholar
  58. US Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Child Maltreatment 1998: Reports from the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000). Online statistical fact sheets: http://www.calib.com/nccanch/pubs/index.htm Google Scholar
  59. Weisbrot, M. (1999). Globalization: A Primer. Washington, DC: Center for Economic and Policy Research. Available from http://www.cepr.net/GlobalPrimer.htm Google Scholar
  60. Wilkinson, R. (1996). Unhealthy societies: The afflictions of inequality. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Zimmerman, M. (2000). Empowerment theory: Psychological, organizational and community levels of analysis. In J. Rappaport & E. Seidman (Eds.), Handbook of Community Psychology (pp. 43–78). New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isaac Prilleltensky

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations