Advertisement

Source Control

  • Theodore R. Davis
  • Jonathan Greene
  • David K. Ramsden

Abstract

The classical paradigm for successful contaminant management is “where possible, remediate the most concentrated area first.”The most contaminated area is commonly called the source area for a release. This applies to successfully managing releases of gasoline containing MTBE. The presence of MTBE as a component in modern gasoline accentuates the need to remove the source area in a timely fashion because of the mobility of MTBE in the underground environment.

Keywords

Unsaturated Soil Source Control Army Corps American Petroleum Institute Vapor Extraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. API (American Petroleum Institute). 2001. Evaluating Hydrocarbon Removal From Source Zones: Tools to Assess Concentration Reduction. January 2001 Edition.Google Scholar
  2. ITRC (The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation). 1996. Technical Requirements for On-Site Low Temperature Thermal Treatment of Non-Hazardous Soils Contaminated with Petroleum/Coal Tar/Gas Plant Wastes. Low Temperature Thermal Desorption Task Group. Final, May 1996.Google Scholar
  3. ITRC (The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation). 1998. General Protocol for Demonstration of In Situ Bioremediation Technologies.Google Scholar
  4. ITRC (The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation). 2001. Technical and Regulatory Guidance for In Situ Chemical Oxidation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater.Google Scholar
  5. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 1983. Dewatering and Groundwater Control. Joint Departments of Army, Air Force and Navy. USACE TM 5-818-5.Google Scholar
  6. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 1987. Bituminous Pavements. Departments of Army and Airforce. USACE TM 5-822-8.Google Scholar
  7. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 1997. In-Situ Air Sparging. CEMP-RT. USACE EM 1110-1-4005.Google Scholar
  8. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 1998. Removal of Underground Storage Tanks (USTs). USACE EM 1110-1-4006.Google Scholar
  9. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 1999. Multi-Phase Extraction. CEMP-R. EM 1110-1-4010.Google Scholar
  10. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 2001. Adsorption Design Guide. CECW-E. USACE DG 1110-1-2.Google Scholar
  11. USACE (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers). 2002. Soil Vapor Extraction and Bioventing. CEMP-ET. USACE EM 1110-1-4001.Google Scholar
  12. USEPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1995a. Cosolvents. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Technology Innovation Office. EPA542-K-94-006.Google Scholar
  13. USEPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1995b. Surfactant Enhancements. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Technology Innovation Office. EPA542-K-94-003.Google Scholar
  14. USEPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). 1995c. Thermal Enhancements. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Technology Innovation Office. EPA542-K-94-009.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Amherst Scientific Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Theodore R. Davis
    • 1
  • Jonathan Greene
    • 2
  • David K. Ramsden
    • 3
  1. 1.Southwestern Environmental, Inc.USA
  2. 2.Malcolm PirnieUSA
  3. 3.URS CorporationUSA

Personalised recommendations