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Protein Restriction and Stone Disease: Myth or Reality?

  • Sara L. BestEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Restriction of dietary protein in an effort to reduce stone recurrence has been a longstanding recommendation for the medical management of stone formers. These recommendations are primarily based on short-term metabolic studies that show potentially lithogenic changes in urinary variables after a dietary protein load. However, a consensus on the protective effect of protein restriction has not been reached in either the epidemiologic literature or in randomized dietary studies evaluating stone recurrence outcomes. This chapter will review and analyze the interesting and sometimes conflicting literature on this topic.

Keywords

Nephrolithiasis Uric acid Dietary modification Medical management Protein 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA

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