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Medical Images and Physiological Signals

  • Marc Thiriet
Chapter
Part of the Biomathematical and Biomechanical Modeling of the Circulatory and Ventilatory Systems book series (BBMCVS, volume 6)

Abstract

Many visualization techniques are available to explore the cardiovascular system from usual ultrasound echography and velocimetry, multislice spiral computed tomography particularly for cardiac imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging for blood flow assessment, to magnetocardiography, diode laser, and optical coherence tomography. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is based on increased blood flow gushing in target regions that are responding to imposed stimuli. Ultrasound scattering from Rayleigh fractal aggregates is proposed for imaging flow dynamics of deformable or hardened red cell clusters in dense suspension.

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Appendices

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    Hoffmann R, Valencia A (2004) A gene network for navigating the literature. Nature – Genetics 36:664 (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins. www.ihop-net.org)
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    BioGRID: General Repository for Interaction Datasets; database of physical and genetic interactions for model organisms (www.thebiogrid.org)
  3. 3.
    GeneCards human gene database. Crown Human Genome Center, Department of Molecular Genetics, the Weizmann Institute of Science (www.genecards.org)
  4. 4.
    Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) Consortium (European Bioinformatics Institute, Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, and Protein Information Resource. www.uniprot.org)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Thiriet
    • 1
  1. 1.Project-team INRIA-UPMC-CNRS REO Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, CNRS UMR 7598Université Pierre et Marie CurieParis Cedex 05France

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