Peacefulness as Nonviolent Dispositions

Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS, volume 20)

Abstract

Nonviolence may be viewed from an intrapersonal, interpersonl, societal, and world perspective. Although these levels and their potential relationships have been discussed in the peace literature, a comprehensive theory of nonviolence to encompass all four levels has been lacking until recently. In addition, the relationship between levels of nonviolence has not been empirically studied because of the lack of measures to assess these four levels. This chapter discusses theories of nonviolence with an emphasis on the Diamond Model that explores the connections between levels of nonviolence. Recent research using the new 90-item Diamond Scale of Nonviolence (DSN) is also presented. The DSN assesses intrapersonal nonviolence (20 items), interpersonal nonviolence (20 items), societal nonviolence (25 items), and world nonviolence (25 items). The four DSN subscales show good internal consistency (alphas between 0.85 and 0.87) and test–retest reliabilities were above 0.85 on all four subscales. Validity data for the four DSN subscales are reported here along with personality correlates of nonviolent dispositions. The DSN is now a psychometrically sound instrument ready for research on nonviolence. Results from several data sets are examined to appraise the interrelationships among the four levels of nonviolence. Preliminary results point to strong links between intrapersonal and interpersonal nonviolence and between societal and world nonviolence and a general hierarchical consistency across the four levels of nonviolence.

Keywords

Nonviolence Theories of nonviolence Diamond Scale of Nonviolence Intrapersonal nonviolence Interpersonal nonviolence Societal nonviolence World nonviolence Measurement of nonviolence 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLewis-Clark State CollegeLewistonUSA

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