Energy and Meteorology: Partnership for the Future

  • Don Gunasekera
  • Alberto Troccoli
  • Mohammed S. Boulahya
Chapter

Abstract

This concluding chapter draws on the main aspects covered in this book, such as the discussions on the increasing reliance of the energy sector on meteorological information. We then describe current and potential funding models of National Meteorological and Hydrological Services. These are the main, though not the only, providers of meteorological information for energy and all the other sectors affected by meteorological phenomena. It emerges that public sector funding for such Services are dwindling. This is in spite of the recognised impacts that meteorology has on the energy industry, and on other sectors. Some lessons from the important interaction between aviation and meteorology are discussed with a view to drawing some parallels with energy. We then discuss possible options for strengthening the relationship between energy and meteorology in order for society to be better prepared for the increasing vulnerability of the energy sector to the vagaries of weather and climate.

Keywords

Europe Shipping Income Shale Expense 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Helpful comments from John Zillman and Ferenc Toth are gratefully appreciated.

References

  1. Dubus L (2010) Practices, needs and impediments in the use of weather/climate information in the electricity sector. In: Troccoli A (ed) Management of weather and climate risk in the energy industry., NATO science seriesSpringer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp 175–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Dubus L (2014) Weather and climate and the power sector: needs, recent developments and challenges. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  3. Dutton et al. (2014) A probabilistic view of weather, climate and the energy industry. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Fischer M (2010) Modelling and forecasting energy demand: principles and difficulties. In: Troccoli A (ed) Management of weather and climate risk in the energy industry., NATO science seriesSpringer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp 207–226CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. George et al. (2014) Weather and climate impacts on Australia’s national electricity market. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  6. Harrison M, Troccoli A, Williams JB, Coughlan M (2008) Seasonal forecasts in decision-making. In: Troccoli A, Harrison M, Anderson DLT, Mason SJ (eds) Seasonal climate: forecasting and managing risk., NATO science seriesSpringer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp 13–42Google Scholar
  7. Johnston PC, Gomez JF, Laplante B (2012) Climate risk and adaptation in the electric power sector. Asian development bank publication. Available at: http://www.iadb.org/intal/intalcdi/PE/2012/12152.pdf
  8. Lior N (2012) Sustainable energy development: the present (2011) situation and possible paths to the future. Energy 43:174–191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Mailier et al. (2014) In Search of the Best Possible Weather Forecast for the Energy Industry. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. Majithia S (2014) Improving resilience challenges and linkages of the energy industry in a changing climate. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  11. Marquis M (2011) Weather, climate and the new energy economy’, BAMS, November, ES38–ES39Google Scholar
  12. Pirone MA (2007), The private sector in meteorology: the next 10 years, Paper presented at the WMO international symposium on public weather services: a key to service delivery, World Meteorological Organisation, Geneva, 3–5 December 2007. Available at: http://www.ametsoc.org/boardpges/cwce/docs/Economic-Study/2007-Pirone-WMO.pdf and also at http://www.wmo.int/pages/prog/amp/pwsp/documents/Symposium_Proceedings_Final.pdf
  13. Pirovano et al. (2014) Combining Meteorological and Electrical Engineering Expertise to Solve Energy Management Problems. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. PMSEIC Independent Working Group (2010), Challenges at energy-water-carbon intersections, report prepared for the Prime Minister’s Science, Engineering and Innovation Council (PMSEIC), Canberra. Available at: http://www.innovation.gov.au/Science/PMSEIC/Documents/ChallengesatEnergyWaterCarbonIntersections.pdf
  15. Rogers D and Tsirkunov V (2011), Managing and delivering national meteorological and hydro-meteorological services, WCIDS Report 2011, Global facility for disaster reduction and recoveryGoogle Scholar
  16. Ronalds et al. (2014) A new era for energy. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  17. Schaeffer R, Szklo AS, de Lucena AFP, Borba BSMC, Nogueira LPP, Fleming FP, Troccoli A, Harrison M, Bouahya MS (2012) Energy sector vulnerability to climate change: a review. Energy 38:1–12CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Shiel et al. (2014) Reducing the energy consumption of existing, residential buildings, for climate change and scarce resource scenarios in 2050. In: Troccoli A, Dubus L, Haupt SE (eds) Weather matters for energy. Springer, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  19. Troccoli et al. (2013) Promoting new links between energy and meteorology. Bull Amer Meteorol Soc. New York (in press)Google Scholar
  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration (2011) International energy outlook 2011, Washington. (http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/ieo/pdf/0484(2011).pdf)
  21. WMO (2007) Guide to aeronautical meteorological services cost recovery: principles and guidance, world meteorological organization report No 904 (2nd edn) Geneva, Switzerland. Available at: www.wmo.int/pages/prog/amp/aemp/documents/904_en.pdf
  22. WMO (2011) Climate knowledge for action: a global framework for climate services—empowering the most vulnerable. World meteorological organization report No 1065, Geneva, Switzerland. Available at: http://www.wmo.int/hlt-gfcs/downloads/HLT_book_full.pdf
  23. Zickfeld F, Wieland A, Blohmke J, Sohm M, Yousef A (2012) Desert power 2050: perspectives on a sustainable power system for EUMENA. A Desertec Industrial Initiative (DII)–Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (EUMENA) publication. Available at: http://www.dii-eumena.com/dp2050/perspectives-on-a-sustainable-power-system-for-eumena.html
  24. Zillman J, Freebairn JW (2001) Economic framework for the provision of meteorological services. WMO Bull 50(3):206–215Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Gunasekera
    • 1
  • Alberto Troccoli
    • 1
  • Mohammed S. Boulahya
    • 2
  1. 1.Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research OrganisationCanberraAustralia
  2. 2.Climate for Development in AfricaTunisTunisia

Personalised recommendations