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Electroencephalography

  • Lucy R. Sullivan
  • Scott Francis Davis
Chapter

Abstract

The electroencephalogram (EEG) is a graphic display of the spontaneous electrical activity of the cerebral cortex. The EEG represents the output of a differential amplifier whose inputs are two distinct recording locations from the scalp (Fig. 10.1). Continuous EEG recordings are used clinically to diagnosis brain pathology, specifically seizures. Intraoperatively, EEG is used to monitor cerebral perfusion and depth of anesthesia. Cortical SSEPs, discussed in another chapter, are brief averaged EEG epochs recorded following peripheral stimulation.

Keywords

Notch Filter Epileptiform Discharge Burst Suppression Analog Filter Ringing Artifact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ASET – The Neurodiagnostic SocietyGoodsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyLouisiana State University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnesthesiologyTulane University School of MedicineNew OrleansUSA

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