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Midlife Concerns and Caregiving Experiences: Intersecting Life Issues Affecting Mental Health

  • Jane E. Myers
  • Melanie C. Harper
Chapter
Part of the Caregiving: Research • Practice • Policy book series (CARE)

Abstract

Caregiving is one experience that transcends or perhaps permeates the multiple perspectives required to understand midlife experiences. The fact that families are the frontline of care, and that one in four households includes a caregiver, has been well established (Family Caregiving in the U.S.: Findings from a National Survey, 1997). Among those who provide care, persons in midlife predominate (Marks, Family Relations 45:27–36, 1996). At any time, approximately 20 % of midlife women and 14 % of midlife men provide care to relatives and friends who are ill or have disabilities. Caregiving during the middle years is so common that Brody (Gerontologist 25:19–29, 1985) defined it as a normative midlife experience, a definition recently challenged by Putney and Bengtson (Handbook of Midlife Development, 2001), and Cavanaugh (Clinical Geropsychology, 1998) explained it as a normative “life event challenge” (p. 131). To get a further understanding of caregiving in midlife, it is first necessary to understand midlife and the normative developmental processes and experiences of this period of life.

Keywords

Family Caregiver Respite Care Adult Development Caregiving Experience National Alliance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Counseling & Educational DevelopmentThe University of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboroUSA
  2. 2.St. Marys UniversitySan AntonioUSA

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