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Relational Turbulence Within Military Couples During Reintegration Following Deployment

  • Leanne K. Knobloch
  • Jennifer A. Theiss
Chapter
Part of the Risk and Resilience in Military and Veteran Families book series (RRMV)

Abstract

Reunion following deployment is a critical juncture for returning service members and their romantic partners. Studies suggest that reintegration can be an emotionally volatile period of heightened expectations, profound joys, and unexpected frustrations. We draw on the relational turbulence model to shed light on how military couples navigate the reentry period. The model argues that times of transition are turbulent within romantic relationships because people encounter relational uncertainty as well as interference from partners in their everyday routines. We devote this chapter to reviewing the model’s assumptions, describing data from investigations involving recently-reunited romantic partners, proposing recommendations for practice, and delineating pathways for future research.

Keywords

Interference from partners Military deployment Relational turbulence Relational uncertainty Transitions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CommunicationUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA
  2. 2.Department of CommunicationRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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