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Religious Organization in the Late Ceramic Caribbean

  • Michele H. Hayward
  • Frank J. Schieppati
  • Michael A. Cinquino
Chapter
Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH, volume 8)

Abstract

Harvey Whitehouse has proposed a theoretical or an organizational framework for studying change and stability in religious systems. Its application in a Late Ceramic Caribbean context suggests an expansive and fluid character to religious or spiritual organization and expression. The physical characteristics and iconography of rock art and other material classes including ceramics and sculpted stone objects (stone collars, elbow stones, and three-pointers or cemís) coupled with ethnohistorical accounts indicate a shift from less structured organization in the Early Ceramic to a more structured one by the Late Ceramic. These data sets also indicate that it was the Taíno elite religious and political segments of societies that were involved in efforts to control ritual objects and places in order to augment their individual and collective influence.

Keywords

Design Layout Religious Organization Virgin Island Religious System Stone Slab 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele H. Hayward
    • 1
  • Frank J. Schieppati
    • 1
  • Michael A. Cinquino
    • 1
  1. 1.Panamerican Consultants, Inc.BuffaloUSA

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