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Psychological and Social Factors

  • Iliana Magiati
  • Elias Tsakanikos
  • Patricia Howlin
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Consistently high rates of psychiatric and behavioral disorders have been reported in incidence and prevalence studies of youth and adults with Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities (DD/ID, i.e., Deb, Thomas, & Bright, 2001; Smiley et al., 2007). This has led to increasingly more research and clinical attention being paid in better understanding mental health difficulties and associated psychopathology in this population in the last 20–30 years, with a small number of excellent comprehensive publications emerging in this field (i.e., Bouras & Holt, 2007; Odom, Horner, Snell, & Blancher, 2007; this handbook). Despite major advances over recent decades in assessing, diagnosing, and treating comorbidity in DD/ID, many limitations in our knowledge and understanding persist. A particular “gap” appears to be in conceptualizing such psychopathology from a psychosocial perspective and in integrating psychosocial and biological perspectives towards an integrated understanding of the precipitating, predisposing, maintaining, and protective factors associated with psychopathology in DD/ID.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Down Syndrome Personality Disorder Intellectual Disability Negative Life Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iliana Magiati
    • 1
  • Elias Tsakanikos
    • 2
  • Patricia Howlin
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of RoehamptonLondonUK
  3. 3.Institute of Psychiatry, King’s CollegeLondonUK

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