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A Monumental Distance: Education and Outreach from the Most Remote Archipelago on Earth

Chapter
Part of the When the Land Meets the Sea book series (ACUA, volume 5)

Abstract

Beyond the main eight populated islands of Hawai’i lies Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument (PMNM). On 15 June 2006, President George W. Bush established PMNM, and on 30 July 2010, the World Heritage Committee of UNESCO unanimously inscribed Papahānaumokuākea as a mixed World Heritage Site. Management of the resources of the Monument includes the natural, cultural, and maritime heritage resources of this remote and dramatic place. The low-lying atolls of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) contain years of seafaring history and the stories of over 120 shipwrecked vessels and sunken aircraft. Efforts to interpret and share these remote time capsules with the public are ongoing as PMNM’s maritime heritage program aims to bring the “place to the people, rather than the people to the place.” This significant, yet generally inaccessible, place provides both challenges and opportunities for creative outreach and public education related to the rich maritime heritage of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands.

Keywords

Hawaiian Island World Heritage Site National Park Service Marine Debris National Marine Fishery Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Papahānaumokuākea Marine National MonumentHonoluluUSA

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