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Hardware and VLSI Designs

  • Mario KirschbaumEmail author
  • Thomas Plos
Chapter
  • 2.7k Downloads

Abstract

Efficient and secure hardware implementations have become a very popular topic during the last decades. In this chapter, we discuss the fundamental design approaches to successfully implement integrated circuits (ICs) as well as testing methods and optimization techniques to achieve an adequate solution for various application scenarios. A major topic handled in this chapter is security in the context of hardware implementations. We elaborate on the characteristics of modern CMOS circuits with regard to side-channel attacks and we discuss possible countermeasure approaches against such attacks. Furthermore, we describe a comprehensive practical example of combining cryptographic instruction set extensions with hardware countermeasures on a modern 32-bit processor platform. In the last section of this chapter, we argue about the assets and drawbacks of implementing test structures in digital circuits with regard to unintentionally opening security holes as well as about intentionally introducing malicious hardware structures, also called hardware Trojans.

Keywords

VLSI design cycle Design space Advanced encryption standard (AES) Secure hardware design Side-channel analysis Power-analysis attacks Masking Hiding Dual-rail precharge Instruction-set extensions Design for test Hardware Trojans 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Applied Information Processing and CommunicationsGraz University of TechnologyGrazAustria

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