Image-Guided Brachytherapy

Chapter

Abstract

Image-guided brachytherapy is the latest evolution of the original form of radiation therapy. Radiation therapy is primarily concerned with the treatment of cancers using ionizing radiation. Brachytherapy is a branch of radiation therapy that delivers radiation by placing radioactive sources in, or in close proximity to, the tumor. Historically brachytherapy has used x-ray films of the implant for documentation and dosimetric evaluation. Recently three-dimensional imaging has been incorporated into brachytherapy procedures, and a taxonomy has been developed (Williamson JF, Cormack RA. Three-dimensional conformal brachytherapy: current trends and future promise. In: Timmerman RD, Xing L, editors. Image-guided and adaptive radiation therapy. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams ?; Wilkins; 2010) including image-based evaluation, image-based treatment planning, and image-guided implants. This chapter discusses the types of brachytherapy and the range of imaging used in brachytherapy.

Keywords

Migration Catheter Attenuation Radioactive Isotope 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Radiation OncologyBrigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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