Sleep-Dependent Changes in Upper Airway Muscle Function

  • Ralph Lydic
  • Laurel Wiegand
  • David Wiegand
Part of the Clinical Physiology book series (CLINPHY)

Abstract

the study respiration across objectively measured states of sleep began in 1959, when electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were first used to monitor sleep during systematic studies of breathing (reviewed in ref. 63). Since that time it has become increasingly clear that the sleep/wake cycle exerts a significant impact on breathing and may fundamentally alter many aspects of central respiratory control (24). The relatively recent discovery that there are several clinical conditions characterized by disordered breathing during sleep has motivated both clinical and basic scientific interest concerning the influence of sleep on respiration.

Keywords

Obesity Depression Respiration Morphine Flare 

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Copyright information

© American Physiological Society 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph Lydic
    • 1
  • Laurel Wiegand
    • 1
  • David Wiegand
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine, Physiology, and SurgeryThe Pennsylvania State University College of MedicineHersheyUSA

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