Second Quarter Century 1913–1937

  • Toby A. Appel

Abstract

During the second quarter century of the American Physiological Society (APS, the Society), physiology in America came of age and became the equal of Old World physiology (10). This new stature was symbolized in 1929 by the first meeting of 600 foreign scientists in America at the International Physiological Congress in Boston. It was a period of remarkable growth and new discoveries. To many it represented the classic era of physiology.

Keywords

Sugar Fatigue Formaldehyde Depression Europe 

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© American Physiological Society 1987

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  • Toby A. Appel

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