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What’s Wrong with Social Capital? Critiques from Social Science

  • Yoji Inaba
Chapter

Abstract

Few would deny the fact that social capital has been one of the most frequently utilized terminologies in academic journals over the past 20 years. However, not all of the citations are positive. Indeed some of them provide a total denial of social capital. This chapter is an attempt to provide answers to critiques of the concept of social capital. The chapter begins with analyses of the criticisms of social capital, followed by an analysis of the valued-added of the concept of social capital. Criticisms of social capital are centered on five ambiguities: ambiguity of the definition, ambiguity on the added value derived from social capital, ambiguity on measurement, ambiguity on causality, and ambiguity as a policy tool. The author proposes a comprehensive analytical model of community structure based on social capital in this paper.

Keywords

Social Capital Public Good Human Relation Generalize Trust Private Good 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nihon UniversityTokyoJapan

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