Advertisement

Promoting Children’s Mental Health: The Importance of Collaboration and Public Understanding

  • Mary Ann McCabe
  • Donald Wertlieb
  • Karen Saywitz
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

In the present chapter we strive to help readers understand the opportunities and impediments for child mental health advocacy. We emphasize the critical importance of enhancing public understanding of the science regarding children’s mental health for public investment in this area. We also build a case for the value of collaboration across stakeholders for effective advocacy and discuss one initiative in depth that is built on this premise—a Summit of child mental health scholars and experts partnering with communication scientists. The collaboration embodied by the Summit illustrates one promising approach to advocacy supported by the scholarship regarding bridging research, practice, and policy.

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Health Problem Child Welfare National Scientific Council Child Mental Health 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. (2009). The five most costly children’s conditions, 2006: Estimates for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized children, ages 0–17. Retrieved from http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/mepsweb/data_files/publications/st242/stat242.shtml
  2. American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  3. American Psychological Association, Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice with Children and Adolescents. (2008). Disseminating evidence-based practice for children and adolescents: A Systems approach to enhancing care. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/practice/resources/evidence/children-report.pdf
  4. American Psychological Association, Task Force on Psychology’s Agenda for Child and Adolescent Mental Health. (2004). Report of the task force on psychology’s agenda for child and adolescent mental health. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/cyf/child_adoles_mentalhealth_report.pdf
  5. American Psychological Association, Working Group on Children’s Mental Health. (2001). Developing psychology’s national agenda for children’s mental health: APA’s response to the Surgeon General’s Action Agenda for Children’s Mental Health. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/cyf/dpnacmh.pdf
  6. Annapolis Coalition. (2007). An action plan for behavioral health workforce development: A framework for discussion. Retrieved from http://www.annapoliscoalition.org/resources/1/Action%20Plan%20-%20Full%20Report.pdf
  7. Benjamin, D. (2007). Differences between strategic frame analysis and social marketing. Retrieved from http://www.frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/framebytes/framebyte_social_marketing.pdf
  8. Biglan, A., Flay, B. R., Embry, D. D., & Sandler, I. N. (2012). The critical role of nurturing environments for promoting human well-being. American Psychologist, 67, 257–271.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Chambers, D. (2007). Disseminating and implementing evidence-based practices for mental health. In M. Welch-Ross & L. Fasig (Eds.), Handbook on communicating and disseminating behavioral science (pp. 365–389). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cohn, D. (2006). Jumping into the political fray: Academics and policy-making. IRPP Policy Matters, 7, 8–36.Google Scholar
  11. Cooper, J. L., Aratani, Y., Knitzer, J., Douglas-Hall, A., Masi, R., Banghart, P., et al. (2008). Unclaimed children revisited: The status of children’s mental health policy in the United States. New York: National Center for Children in Poverty. Retrieved from http://nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_853.pdf
  12. Cooper, J. L., & Ardoin, M. (2009). Obituary: Jane Knitzer (1941–2009). The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 79, 439–440.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Erard, M. (2011, August). Metaphors as cognitive tools: The case of child mental health. In M. A. McCabe (Chair), Public policy and the science of child mental health: How communication science bridges the divide. Symposium conducted at annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington DC.Google Scholar
  14. Erard, M. (2012, August). Metaphors as cognitive tools: The case of child mental health. In M. A. McCabe (Chair), Public policy and the science of child mental health: How communication science bridges the divide. Invited symposium conducted at annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL.Google Scholar
  15. Fixsen, D., Naoom, S. F., Blasé, K. A., Friedman, R. M., & Wallace, F. (2005). Implementation research: A synthesis of the literature. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida.Google Scholar
  16. FrameWorks Institute. (2009a). Child mental health: A review of the scientific discourse: A FrameWorks research report. Retrieved from http://frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/PDF_childmentalhealth/childmentalhealthsummaryexcerpt.pdf
  17. FrameWorks Institute. (2009b). Conflicting models of mind in mind: Mapping the gaps between the expert and the public understandings of child mental health as part of strategic frame analysis™. Retrieved from http://frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/PDF_childmentalhealth/childmentalhealthculturalmodels.pdf
  18. FrameWorks Institute. (2010). How to talk about children’s mental health: A FrameWorks message memo. Retrieved from http://www.frameworksinstitute.org/assets/files/CMH_MM.pdf
  19. Gladwell, M. (2000). The tipping point: How little things can make a big difference. Boston, MA: Little Brown.Google Scholar
  20. Heckman, J. (2007). The economics, technology, and neuroscience of human capability formation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104, 13250–13255.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Heckman, J. (2008). Schools, skills, synapses. Retrieved from http://www.heckmanequation.org/content/resource/schools-skills-synapses
  22. Kendall-Taylor, N. (2011, August). Rethinking child mental health: Seeing perceptual barriers to policy in media and mind. In M. A. McCabe (Chair), Public policy and the science of child mental health: How communication science bridges the divide. Symposium conducted at annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  23. Kendall-Taylor, N. (2012, August). Rethinking child mental health: Seeing perceptual barriers to policy in media and mind. In M. A. McCabe (Chair), Public policy and the science of child mental health: How communication science bridges the divide. Invited symposium conducted at annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL.Google Scholar
  24. Kendall-Taylor, N. & Lindland, E. (2012, January). Strategic framing of child mental health. Paper presented at the quarterly meeting of the National Consortium of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  25. Kessler, R. C. & Wang, P. S. (2008). The descriptive epidemiology of commonly occurring mental disorders in the United States. Annual Review of Public Health, 29, 115–129. Retrieved from  10.1146/annurev.pubhealth.29.020907.090847
  26. Knitzer, J., & Cooper, J. (2006). Beyond integration: Challenges for children’s mental health. Health Affairs, 25, 670–679. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.25.3.670 no. 3 670–679.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. McCabe, M. A., & Browning, A. (2010). Disseminating and communicating your applied research findings to the public. In V. Maholmes & C. Lomonaco (Eds.), Applied research in child and adolescent development: A practical approach (pp. 247–266). New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  28. McLearn, K., Knitzer, J., & Carter, A. (2007). Mental health: A neglected partner in the healthy development of young children. In J. L. Aber, S. J. Bishop-Josef, S. M. Jones, K. T. McLearn, & D. A. Philips (Eds.), Child development and social policy (pp. 233–248). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  30. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2009). Preventing mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders among young people: Progress and possibilities. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.Google Scholar
  31. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2004a). Children’s emotional development is built into the architecture of their brains: Working paper #2. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/reports_and_working_papers/wp2/
  32. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2004b). Young children develop in an environment of relationships: Working paper #1. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/reports_and_working_papers/wp1/
  33. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2005). Excessive stress disrupts the architecture of the developing brain: Working paper #3. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/reports_and_working_papers/wp3/
  34. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2007). The science of early childhood development: Closing the gap between what we know and what we do. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php/resources/reports_and_working_papers/science_of_early_childhood_development/
  35. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2007). The timing and quality of early experiences combine to shape brain architecture: Working paper #5. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/reports_and_working_papers/
  36. National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. (2008). Mental health problems in early childhood can impair learning and behavior for life: Working paper #6. Retrieved from http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/reports_and_working_papers/wp6/
  37. Schoenwald, S. K., & Hoagwood, K. (2001). Effectiveness, transportability, and dissemination of interventions: What matters when? Psychiatric Services, 52, 1190–1197.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Society for Research in Child Development. (2009). Report of healthy development: A summit on young children’s mental health. Partnering with Communication Scientists, Collaborating across Disciplines and Leveraging Impact to Promote Children’s Mental Health. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/pi/families/Summit-report.aspx
  39. Society for Research in Child Development SRCD. (2010, May 3). Briefing on the report: Healthy development: The summit on young children’s mental health [Congressional Briefing]. Retrieved from http://www.srcd.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=415&Itemid=1
  40. Sturmey, P., & Hersen, M. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of evidence-based practice in clinical psychology (Child and adolescent disorders, Vol. I). Ney York, NY: Wiley.Google Scholar
  41. The President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. (2003). Achieving the promise: Transforming mental health care in America. Final report. (DHHS Publication No. SMA-03-3832). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  42. Tolan, P. H., & Dodge, K. A. (2005). Children’s mental health as a primary care and concern: A system for comprehensive support and service. American Psychologist, 60, 601–614.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. U.S. Public Health Service. (1999). Mental health: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/home.html
  44. U.S. Public Health Service. (2000). Report of the Surgeon General’s Conference on Children’s Mental Health: A national action agenda. Rockville, MD: Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44233/
  45. Wallace F., Blase, K., Fixsen, D., & Naoom, S. (2008). What we know about: Implementing the findings of research: Bridging the gap between knowledge and practice. Educational Research Service.Google Scholar
  46. Wandersman, A., Duffy, J., Flaspohler, P., Noonon, R., Lubell, K., Stillman, L., et al. (2008). Bridging the gap between prevention research and practice: The interactive systems framework for dissemination and implementation. American Journal of Community Psychology, 41, 171–181. doi: 10.1007/s10464-008-9174-z.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Welch-Ross, M., & Fasig, L. (Eds.). (2007). Handbook on communicating and disseminating behavioral science. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  48. Yoshikawa, H., Aber, J. L., & Beardslee, W. R. (2012). The effects of poverty on the mental, emotional, and behavioral health of children and youth: Implications for prevention. American Psychologist, 67, 272–284.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Ann McCabe
    • 1
  • Donald Wertlieb
    • 2
  • Karen Saywitz
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsGeorge Washington University School of MedicineWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Department of Child DevelopmentTufts UniversityBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUCLA School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations