Gonadotropins

  • Roy O. Greep
Part of the People and Ideas book series (PEOPL)

Abstract

The history of the gonadotropins covers an amazingly short period of time considering the important role they play in basic physiology throughout the vertebrate animal kingdom. It is in fact confined to little more than the last half century. Unlike most other aspects of physiology, the gonadotropins have no links to the ancient world or the omniscient observers of those times, such as Aristotle, Hippocrates, and Galen—not even to the all-encompassing cognition of the great Renaissance man Leonardo Da Vinci. Most surprising of all is that Regnier de Graaf, who in the late seventeenth century provided a detailed and remarkably accurate account of the male and female reproductive systems in humans and some domestic animals and made several very perceptive observations about their functions, failed to even speculate on what caused the ovarian follicles (which still bear his name) to enlarge, rupture, and form “globules.”

Keywords

Recombination Testosterone Fractionation Progesterone Androgen 

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Copyright information

© American Physiological Society 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy O. Greep

There are no affiliations available

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