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Scuttled, But Not Yet Abandoned: The Genesis and Evolution of Antipodean Studies on the Australian West Coast

  • Michael McCarthy
Chapter

Abstract

In the late 1970s, with an overarching departmental focus on bullion-carrying East-India ships and former slave traders, it fell to the most inexperienced and unqualified of the maritime archaeologists then present in Western Australia to examine and manage a suite of seemingly mundane abandoned nineteenth and twentieth century vessels in a ship graveyard. The recognition of the abandoned and recently scuttled hulk is now such that it occupies an important place amongst shipwrecks having an attraction, significance, and worth that is now often far beyond its former service value. This work first examines the unlikely genesis of what has since become a mainstream study and concludes with an overview of the present situation.

Keywords

Port Authority Underwater Cultural Heritage Dive Site Maritime Archaeology Museum Staff 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Western Australian Museum Shipwreck GalleriesWestern Australian MuseumFremantleAustralia

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