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Smoking Prevention Through Mass Media Campaigns

  • Giuseppe La Torre
  • Ferruccio Pelone
  • Marta Marino
  • Antonio Giulio De Belvis
Chapter

Objectives

The goal of this chapter is to describe the role of health communication in preventing smoking habits providing the reader with useful insight toward the theoretical and empirical underpinning of mass media campaigns. At the end of this chapter you will be able to address the tobacco prevention mass media campaigns core issues (e.g., theoretical framework and basic knowledge) and summarizing both the up-to-date scientific evidence and institutional reports.

Keywords

Tobacco Control Smoking Prevention Target Audience Media Campaign Preventive Service Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York  2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe La Torre
    • 1
  • Ferruccio Pelone
    • 2
  • Marta Marino
    • 2
  • Antonio Giulio De Belvis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases“Sapienza” University of RomeRomeItaly
  2. 2.Institute of Hygiene - Department of Public Health, Faculty of MedicineUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomeItaly

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