Case 60: Respiratory Arrest After Extubation

  • John G. Brock-Utne
Chapter

Abstract

It is late in the evening. You are taking over a case from one of your colleagues. The patient is an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I (ASA 1), 14-year-old girl, 52 kg, and 5′5″. She is having an operation for nonunion of a fractured tibia. The patient is supine and the head is beside the anesthesia machine. Your colleague gives you a full report. You note gas flows, the anesthetic record, and the vital signs. The oxygen tank is full and the pipeline pressure is normal. The suction is attached and working. The patient is otherwise healthy and she has no allergies. There has been minimal blood loss, due to the use of a tourniquet. She is intubated with a #7 endotracheal tube (ETT) and mechanically ventilated. You note no Guedel airway in her mouth, but an esophageal stethoscope with a temperature sensor (DeRoyal, 200 DeBusk Lane, Powell. TN 37849)

Keywords

Rubber Sevoflurane Cough Meperidine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • John G. Brock-Utne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnesthesiaStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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