Advertisement

Ethical Considerations in Clinical Engineering

  • Winston Gwee
Chapter

Abstract

To many, clinical engineering is often confused as being the same as biomedical engineering. In particular, the former is actually a branch of biomedical engineering that manages the deployment of medical technology and integrates it appropriately with desired medical practices. Typically, a clinical engineer works in a healthcare establishment such as a hospital or a specialists’ center. The clinical engineer can be considered as a professional who would bridge the communication gaps amongst the medical, administrative, and technical personnel in the healthcare sector. From this regard, the work undertaken by a clinical engineer would have a direct impact in improving the care for patients by leveraging technological solutions in the diagnosis and therapy. By the definition of the American College of Clinical Engineering (ACCE), a clinical engineer is a professional who supports and advances patient care by applying engineering and management skills to healthcare technology (American College of Clinical Engineering (ACCE) 2011). Figure 3.1 shows that there are a number of career options (though not an exhaustive list) for a biomedical engineer which includes being a clinical engineer.

Keywords

Clinical engineer Public health Patient safety Product design Preventive maintenance Equipment management Conflicts of interests Whistle blowing 

References

  1. American College of Clinical Engineering (ACCE) (2011) Clinical Engineer (defined) [Internet] [Cited 3 Apr 2012]. http://www.accenet.org/default.asp?page=about&section=definition
  2. Channel News Asia (2009) MOH alerts hospitals after two women given wrong dosage of cancer drugs [Internet] [Cited 2 Apr 2012]. http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stories/singaporelocalnews/view/1017828/1/.html
  3. Darr K (2005) Ethic in health services management, 4th edn. Health Profession, Baltimore, MDGoogle Scholar
  4. Deurenberg-Yap M, Foo LL, Low YY, Chan SP, Vijaya K, Lee M (2005) The Singaporean response to the SARS outbreak: knowledge sufficiency versus public trust. Health Promot Int 20:320–326CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dyro J (2004) Clinical engineering handbook. Elsevier, Amsterdam, pp 590–592Google Scholar
  6. ECRI Institute (1992) Loose screws in TV mounts. Health Devices 21(11):427Google Scholar
  7. Loughlin S, Williams JS (2011) The top 10 medical device challenges. Biomed Instrum Technol 45:98–104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. The Free Dictionary (2012) [Internet] [Cited 4 Apr 2012]. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Code+of+Ethics

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Electronic and Computer Engineering Division, School of EngineeringNgee Ann PolytechnicSingaporeSingapore

Personalised recommendations