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Unstable Angina and Non-ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (Acute Coronary Syndromes)

Chapter

Abstract

Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the sequelae that stem from this disease process affect millions of patients every year. In addition to a comprehensive history and physical examination, biochemical markers have been developed to aid in diagnosing ACS. Once the diagnosis has been established, there is a medley of medications that are used commonly in the treatment of unstable angina. These medications include anti-ischemic, vasodilator, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, and statin therapies. Increasingly, newer agents within each drug class are being developed and utilized. Beyond medical therapy, revascularization is frequently performed and is very efficacious in treating ACS. The timing, extent, and type of revascularization are individualized to each patient and are determined by the clinical, local, and anatomical nature of the patient’s underlying coronary artery disease.

Keywords

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Acute Coronary Syndrome Unstable Angina Unfractionated Heparin Acute Chest Pain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Bavry AA, Kumbhani DJ, Rassi AN, et al. Benefit of early invasive therapy in acute coronary syndromes: a meta-analysis of contemporary randomized clinical trials. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006;48(7):1319–25.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Mehta SR, Granger CB, Boden WE, et al. Early versus delayed invasive intervention in acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med. 2009;360(21):2165–7.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Stone GW, McLaurin BT, Cox DA, et al. Bivalirudin for patients with acute coronary syndromes. N Engl J Med. 2006;355(21):2203.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Stone GW, Bertrand ME, Moses JW, et al. Routine upstream initiation vs. deferred selective use of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors in acute coronary syndromes: the ACUITY Timing trial. JAMA. 2007;297(6):591–602.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Wright RS, Anderson JL, Adams CD, et al. 2011 ACCF/AHA focused update of the Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Unstable Angina/Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (updating the 2007 guideline): a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines developed in collaboration with the American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011;57(19):1920–59.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of CardiologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Cardiac Catheterization LaboratoriesThe Methodist Debakey Heart and Vascular CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineWeill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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