Skin Cancer Epidemic in American Hispanic and Latino Patients

Chapter

Abstract

The 2012 US Census states that Hispanics or Latinos comprise almost 17 % of the US population (Humes KR, Jones NA, Ramirez RR. Overview of race and Hispanic Origin: 2010. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau; 2011. http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-02.pdf). And this is envisioned to continue to grow in size in the next 20 years. The prediction made by the US Census Bureau is that by the year 2050, 50 % of the US population will be comprised of minorities including Hispanics, Asians, and African Americans (Census 2000. US Dept of Commerce Economics and Statistics Administration, US Census Bureau; 2002. http://www.census.gov/prod/2002pubs/c2kprof00-us.pdf. Accessed 7 Mar 2008). Because of this growth and influx of Hispanics in the United States, now, more than ever, it is pivotal to raise awareness of skin cancer in people of color.

Keywords

Skin cancer epidemic American Hispanic Latino Melanin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Larkin Community HospitalSouth MiamiMexico
  2. 2.Miami Childrens Hospital / Children’s Skin CenterMiamiMexico

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