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Eating Disorders in Adolescence

  • Renee Rienecke Hoste
  • Daniel Le Grange
Chapter

Abstract

Eating disorders are serious illnesses that usually begin during adolescence and are often associated with significant medical complications and psychological impairment. Children and adolescents often do not meet full criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN); however, those with subthreshold eating disorders have not been found to differ significantly from those with full threshold AN or BN in terms of psychopathology or medical complications. Eating disorders are multifaceted illnesses with biological, psychological, and environmental risk factors, including weight concerns, dieting behavior, negative emotionality, genetics, and sociocultural influences. The treatment of eating disorders requires a team approach, with a mental health expert to address the patient’s psychotherapeutic needs, a physician to monitor the patient’s physical health, and, if necessary, a psychiatrist to manage comorbid psychiatric concerns. Family-based treatment has been found to be an effective form of treatment for adolescents with AN, and cognitive-behavioral therapy, adapted for use with adolescents, has shown promise in the treatment of adolescents with BN.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Binge Eating Bulimia Nervosa Binge Eating Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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