Advertisement

Validating Low-Level Footfall-Induced Vibration Predictions in Steel and Concrete Structures

  • Michael J. Wesolowsky
  • Julia M. Graham
  • J. Shayne Love
  • Jon K. Galsworthy
  • John C. Swallow
Conference paper
Part of the Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series book series (CPSEMS)

Abstract

Occupant footfalls are often the most critical source of floor vibration on the elevated floors of buildings. Floor motions can disturb occupants, leading to frequent complaints and loss of functionality. In laboratory and healthcare facilities, this issue can be more critical, as high-resolution imaging equipment with stringent vibration criteria is often employed. Achieving these criteria requires sufficiently stiff and massive floor structures to effectively resist the forces exerted from user traffic. The difficulty for engineers is predicting these low levels of vibration. Two commonly used analysis methods to predict footfall vibration levels in steel buildings are the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Design Guide 11, and The Steel Construction Institute (SCI) P354. The latter is more robust, as it can predict multi-modal time history responses at any point on the floor. Dynamic footfall loading is determined by considering walkers moving along reasonable pathways identified in the architectural floor plans. For concrete structures, The Concrete Centre (CCIP-016) proposes a methodology similar to the SCI. In this study, three steel and one concrete building are instrumented to measure footfall-induced vibrations. The measured values are compared to the predictions of the aforementioned methods, and the superiority of the SCI-P354 and CCIP-016 methods is shown.

Keywords

Footfall vibration Vibration measurements Model validation Sensitive floors Dynamic loading 

References

  1. 1.
    Wilford MR, Young P, Field C (2007) Predicting footfall-induced vibration. Struct Build 160(SB2):65–79Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Murray TM, Allen DE, Ungar EE (1997) Floor vibration due to human activity. AISC design guide, series no 11. American Institute of Steel Construction, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Smith AL, Hicks SJ, Devine PJ (2009) Design of floors for vibration: a new approach – revised edition (SCI P354). Steel Construction Institute, AscotGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Willford MR, Young P (2006) A design guide for footfall induced vibration of structures (CCIP-016). The Concrete Centre, Blackwater, CamberleyGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    BS 6472:1992 (1992) Guide to evaluation of human exposure to vibration in buildings (1 Hz to 80 Hz). British Standards Institution, LondonGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Amick H, Gendreau M, Busch T, Gordon C (2005) Evolving criteria for research facilities: I – vibration. In: Proceeding of SPIE conference 5933: buildings for nanoscale research and beyond, San Diego, 31 July to 1 Aug 2005Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    ISO 2631-2 (1989) Evaluation of human exposure to whole-body vibration – part 2: human exposure to continuous and shock-induced vibrations in buildings (1 to 80 Hz). International Standard, ISO 2631-2, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Murray T (2006) FloorVibe (Version 2.02) [Software], Structural Engineers, Inc., Radford, Virginia, USAGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Society for Experimental Mechanics, Inc. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Wesolowsky
    • 1
  • Julia M. Graham
    • 2
  • J. Shayne Love
    • 2
  • Jon K. Galsworthy
    • 2
  • John C. Swallow
    • 1
  1. 1.Swallow Acoustic Consultants Ltd.MississaugaCanada
  2. 2.Rowan Williams Davies & Irwin Inc.GuelphCanada

Personalised recommendations