Outpatient Units

  • David P. Wacker
  • Wendy K. Berg
  • Kelly M. Schieltz
  • Patrick W. Romani
  • Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Pediatric outpatient clinics are often the setting in which patients request and receive information and consultation from staff about their child’s problem behavior. The results of functional analyses of the child’s problem behavior can contribute to development of effective reinforcement-based treatments. Because of the time restrictions imposed on outpatient clinic evaluations, brief functional analyses are conducted to identify the function of the child’s problem behavior and to develop effective treatments matched to function. In this chapter, we describe how we conduct brief functional analyses, brief antecedent analyses, brief concurrent operants analyses, and brief treatment analyses within outpatient clinics serving children who display problem behavior. For each procedure, we provide a case example and describe how we use the analyses for treatment planning.

Keywords

Constipation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Wacker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wendy K. Berg
    • 2
  • Kelly M. Schieltz
    • 2
  • Patrick W. Romani
    • 2
  • Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsThe University of Iowa Children’s HospitalIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.Center for Disabilities and DevelopmentThe University of Iowa Children’s HospitalIowa CityUSA

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