Limited Motivation, Patient-Therapist Mismatch, and the Therapeutic Alliance

Chapter

Abstract

While empirically supported treatments have made great headway for patients with anxiety disorders, many barriers continue to exist in order for patients to experience symptom remission. In this chapter, we consider the roles of patient motivation for change, patient-therapist mismatch, and the therapeutic alliance as understudied factors that can be used to enhance outcomes. While these factors are often portrayed as in conflict with or as obviating the use for structured interventions, we display how these approaches can be used in tandem to enhance the efficacy of existing interventions.

Keywords

Depression Attenuation Assure Straw Clarification 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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