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Anxiety Disorders and Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of Broadband Self-Report Measures of Personality in Diagnosis, Case Conceptualization, and Treatment Planning

Chapter

Abstract

Objective personality assessment is a major approach to evaluation for treatment planning. Several empirically sound instruments that have considerable utility in the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders are described. The use of these instruments to assist with differential diagnosis, identifying comorbid conditions, detecting and disentangling maintaining factors, and measuring pertinent transdiagnostic variables is discussed. Special focus is given to the use of personality measures in the development of individualized, evidence-based treatment plans for specific anxiety disorders.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Social Anxiety Disorder Family Dysfunction Anxiety Treatment Homework Compliance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The author would like to thank his intern, Olivia Maldonado, for kindly assisting with the preparation of this chapter.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy & ResearchWhite PlainsUSA
  2. 2.New York City Children’s Center, NY State Office of Mental HealthBelleroseUSA

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