Water

  • John M. deMan
Part of the Food Science Text Series book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Water is an essential constituent of many foods. It may occur as an intracellular or extracellular component in vegetable and animal products, as a dispersing medium or solvent in a variety of products, as the dis-persed phase in some emulsified products such as butter and margarine, and as a minor constituent in other foods. Table 1-1 indicates the wide range of water content in foods.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. deMan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceUniversity of GuelphGuelphCanada

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