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Introduction

  • Moshe Oren
  • Yael AylonEmail author
Chapter
  • 1.5k Downloads

Abstract

Twenty years ago marks a fascinating beginning of the new fledgling life of a novel signaling cascade—the Hippo Pathway. Today we are still grasping to understand its biological context and scrabbling to find new modulators of the pathway. Research is in full swing, and does not show any signs of slowing down in the foreseeable future.

Keywords

Hippo Pathway Lats Hpo Yap 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular Cell BiologyWeizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael

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