Borderland in the Middle: The Delaware Colony on the Atlantic Coast

Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA, volume 37)

Abstract

In the battle over the origins of the United States, scholars and publics have claimed primacy for the Middle Atlantic region as a central place in the mythology of the United States as a nation whose exceptionalism and greatness were destined due to the dynamic energy and creativity inherent in cross-cultural exchange. Spatially middling, the region, and in particular Delaware, was simultaneously a contested borderland with a unique, often misunderstood colonial history. So too was Sweden both the middle of Scandinavia and the northern borderland of Europe. In the early seventeenth century, Sweden’s imperialism brought the European cultural centre to the margins. This chapter explores the implications of these spatial imaginaries. The materialities of seventeenth-century imperial–colonial Sweden were both crafted in the dynamic, liminal, tweenness of borderlands in the middle.

Keywords

Manifold Europe Hunt Excavation Dine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA

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