Middle East Perspectives on the Achievability of Peace

  • Lane Smith
  • Tristyn Campbell
  • Raja Tayeh
  • Heyam Mohammed
  • Rouba Youssef
  • Feryal Turan
  • Irene Colthurst
  • Alev Yalcinkaya
  • William Tastle
  • Majed Ashy
  • Abdul Kareem Al-Obaidi
  • Dalit Yassour-Boroschowitz
  • Helena Syna Desivilya
  • Kamala Smith
  • Linda Jeffrey
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS, volume 7)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on Middle Eastern perspectives regarding the achievability of world peace. The Middle Eastern region, although rife with national and transnational conflict, has undertaken many peacebuilding efforts, such as the Madrid-Oslo process, as outlined in this chapter. This chapter also briefly discusses conflicts in this area that have hampered peace. A sample of 398 respondents from Middle Eastern countries responded to two survey questions regarding the achievability of world peace. Responses were coded for agency, disengagement, and humanitarian engagement, as well as prerequisites for peace. Despite living in an area that has been conflict laden for thousands of years, respondents to the survey were largely optimistic regarding the achievability of world peace, offering many solutions they believed could bring about peace. Perhaps not surprisingly, there was also considerable recognition that war, hate, and violence are barriers to the achievement of peace. This chapter ends by discussing the region’s future in relation to the recent Arab Spring, mentioning important steps necessary to achieve peace and factors that must be taken into consideration in peace efforts.

Keywords

Europe Syria Turkey Egypt Oman 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lane Smith
    • 1
  • Tristyn Campbell
    • 2
  • Raja Tayeh
    • 3
  • Heyam Mohammed
    • 4
  • Rouba Youssef
    • 5
  • Feryal Turan
    • 6
  • Irene Colthurst
    • 7
  • Alev Yalcinkaya
    • 8
  • William Tastle
    • 9
  • Majed Ashy
    • 10
  • Abdul Kareem Al-Obaidi
    • 11
  • Dalit Yassour-Boroschowitz
    • 12
  • Helena Syna Desivilya
    • 13
  • Kamala Smith
    • 14
  • Linda Jeffrey
    • 15
  1. 1.Univerysity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Psychology DepartmentBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  3. 3.Doane CollegeCreteUSA
  4. 4.Department of Curriculum and Instruction, College of EducationKuwait UniversityKuwaitKuwait
  5. 5.PsychologyUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA
  6. 6.Department of SociologyAnkara UniversityAnkaraTurkey
  7. 7.Department of International RelationsSan Diego UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  8. 8.Department of PsychologyYeditepeIstanbulTurkey
  9. 9.Ithaca College of BusinessNew YorkUSA
  10. 10.Psychology DepartmentBay State CollegeBostonUSA
  11. 11.Institute of International EducationNew YorkUSA
  12. 12.Department of Human ServicesEmek Yezreel CollegeJezreel ValleyIsrael
  13. 13.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyYezreel Valley CollegeEmek YezreelIsrael
  14. 14.Behavioral Health Analyst, Abt AssociatesCambridgeUSA
  15. 15.College of EducationRowan UniversityGlassboroUSA

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