Methods for Deriving Pesticide Aquatic Life Criteria for Sediments

  • Tessa L. Fojut
  • Martice E. Vasquez
  • Anita H. Poulsen
  • Ronald S. Tjeerdema
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 224)

Abstract

Sediments represent an integral component of aquatic ecosystems that provide habitat and food sources for aquatic life. Although many international and local governments have regulations in place to protect aquatic life, the majority of these are focused on or are based upon criteria for conserving water quality, and these have been in place for many years. After release to the aqueous environment, however, various organic chemicals tend to accumulate in sediments, where they may cause toxicity to aquatic life, even when water quality criteria (WQC) are met. Sediments comprise a complex medium and pose unique challenges for those who would like to develop single numeric concentrations below which aquatic life is protected. Currently, no official US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) methods or other agreed upon approaches are available in the United States for generating such sediment quality criteria (SQC).

Keywords

PCBs Bivalve Sorb Phthalate Phenanthrene 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank the following reviewers: Daniel McClure (CRWQCB-CVR), Xin Deng (California Department of Pesticide Regulation), Dominic Di Toro (University of Delaware), and G. Fred Lee and Anne Jones-Lee (G. Fred Lee & Associates). This project was funded through a contract with the CRWQCB-CVR. Mention of specific products, policies, or procedures does not represent endorsement by the CRWQCB-CVR.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tessa L. Fojut
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martice E. Vasquez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anita H. Poulsen
    • 1
  • Ronald S. Tjeerdema
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Toxicology, College of Agricultural and Environmental SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control BoardRancho CordovaUSA

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