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Introduction

  • Polly Schaafsma
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Anthropology book series (BRIEFSANTHRO)

Abstract

Rock art is one of the most immediately accessible aspects of the archaeological record. Persisting over millennia and viewed by numerous peoples and cultures through time, petroglyphs and rock paintings are not only highly provocative but interactive, as they continue to exert their power on observers, demanding meaning. Rock art is not inert cultural residue. Images function in many ways, and as visually oriented human beings, we are all affected by and respond to images that invade our lives at every turn through a multitude of media in contemporary societies. Encountered in the landscape, images carved or painted on stone equally capture our attention, engendering a multitude of perceptions that vary greatly depending on our cultural legacies, roles, and personal histories. These responses have recently given rise to the multifaceted ethical considerations reviewed in this book.

Keywords

Archaeological Record Aesthetic Quality Cultural Legacy Numerous People Artistic Legacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Polly Schaafsma
    • 1
  1. 1.Museum of New MexicoSanta FeUSA

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