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Archaeology and Development in a Maritime Context, Highlighting Drogheda and the Boyne Estuary as a Case Study

  • Niall Brady
  • Edward Pollard
Chapter
Part of the One World Archaeology book series (WORLDARCH, volume 1)

Abstract

The archaeology of the coastal zone has emerged as a recognised area of research that informs an understanding of cultural heritage with a particular focus on maritime culture (O’Sullivan 2001; McErlean et al. 2002; O’Sullivan and Breen 2007). Ireland’s island entity presents an ideal opportunity to engage with this study. Significant progress has been made over the last two decades as researchers have become increasingly aware of the dynamic nature of the littoral landscape. Attention has concentrated on issues relating to changes in the natural environment. Geological processes relating to isostatic response and geomorphological processes of erosion and deposition are being considered in terms of how they might affect the surviving archaeological record (Bell et al. 2006; Edwards and O’Sullivan 2007). It is a subject area that is growing alongside global realisations of climate change and rising sea levels. One area that awaits assessment is the impact of development activities on the coastal environment (Williams 2002).

Keywords

River Channel Thirteenth Century High Water Mark Environmental Impact Statement Dredging Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The project was supported by the Heritage Council under the Irish National Strategic Archaeological Research (INSTAR) programme, 2008. The authors wish to thank their respective organisations at the time for support in this project: the Archaeological Diving Company Ltd. and the Discovery Programme.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Archaeological Diving CompanyKilkennyIreland
  2. 2.ORCA Marine, Archaeology DepartmentOrkney College UHIKirkwall, OrkneyUK

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