Conclusion

  • Stephen T. Sonis
  • Stephen T. Sonis
  • Stephen T. Sonis
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
Chapter

Abstract

Toxicities have been an accepted consequence of radiation- and drug-based cancer therapies since the times of Curie and Farber. Inevitably patients’ anxieties were not only about the prognosis associated with their cancer diagnosis but also about the treatment-related hell they would be expected to endure. The pitch that treatment side effects however horrible were a small price to pay for effective cancer interventions was preached by caregivers and tolerated by patients. Supportive cancer care was reactive, rudimentary, and without scientific rationale. Dose de-escalation or breaks in radiation were primary strategies to minimize toxicity, but had an adverse effect on tumor control.

Keywords

Fatigue Toxicity Havoc 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen T. Sonis
    • 1
  • Stephen T. Sonis
    • 2
  • Stephen T. Sonis
    • 3
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
    • 4
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
    • 5
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
    • 6
  • Dorothy M. Keefe
    • 7
  1. 1.Harvard School of Dental MedicineBostonUSA
  2. 2.Divisions of Oral MedicineBrigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer InstituteBostonUSA
  3. 3.Biomodels, LLCBostonUSA
  4. 4.South Australian Cancer ServiceAdelaideAustralia
  5. 5.Faculty of Health SciencesUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia
  6. 6.Sansom InstituteUniversity of South AustraliaAdelaideAustralia
  7. 7.Royal Adelaide Hospital Cancer CentreAdelaideAustralia

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