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Improving Intergovernmental Coordination

  • Edward Weiner
Chapter

Abstract

As the number and scope of federal programs for urban development and transportation projects expanded, there was increasing concern over the uncoordinated manner in which these projects were being carried out. Each of these federal programs had separate grant requirements which were often development with little regard to the requirements of other programs. Projects proceeded through the approval and implementation process uncoordinated with other projects that were occurring in the same area.

Keywords

National Highway Historic Preservation Transportation Project Highway Safety Intergovernmental Cooperation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Weiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Silver SpringUSA

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