The Growth of Sustainable Development

  • Edward Weiner
Chapter

Abstract

As the concern for the effects of transportation on living quality and the environment grew, broader approaches to transportation planning were being developed. This concern was being expressed not only in the USA but worldwide. The term “sustainable development” became popularized in 1987 when the World Commission on Environment used it to describe a process of economic growth with “the ability to ensure the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The global impact of transportation on the environment was reemphasized at the United Nations Conference on the Environment in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992 which focused on global climate change.

Keywords

Transportation Propane Income Marketing Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Weiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Silver SpringUSA

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